Plant sprouting in healthy soil

Sustainability, soil health, crop rotation and good yields

In conversation with Dr. Diane Knight With increased focus on sustainable food production and optimal yields to feed a growing population, producers find themselves under increased pressure to respond to these changing demands. Decades of research have helped identify ways to modify farming practices to help maintain sustainability and soil health while also finding efficiencies and protecting profitability. To get …

Territory Manager wearing Dutch Openers sales shirt

Spring Fertilizer Requirements

Snow might still be on the ground, but it’s never too early to think about the year ahead. Many producers have their crop plans already in place.  Last fall’s early snow means spring fertilizing is on the radar for a lot of farmers. In this month’s article, we talk to Connor Bohachewski, our Territory Manager for northern Saskatchewan and northern …

Women In Ag: Changing The Face Of Farming

Based on the 2016 agriculture census from Stats Canada, the proportion of female farmers is increasing even as the total number of farm operators decreases. In fact, women make up 28.7% of the 272,000 farmers in the country. Yet while more women are working hard on the land, sometimes they also have to work equally as hard to dispel public …

Two male farmers observing a pile of manure

The Do’s & Don’ts of Manure Spreading

Sheldon Grywacheski is a grain producer and professional engineer born and raised in Saskatchewan. He’s gained 30 years of experience working with John Deere, Mitsubishi Hitachi, Brandt Engineered Product, Case Corporation, the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute, and now Dutch Industries. Sheldon has also had extensive exposure to farms and to producers throughout Canada, the United States, South America, Europe and …

Farming a High Stress Game for Veteran Farmer

Having farmed for approximately 45 years now, Rick Backes has faced every challenge that farmers can face, from being forced to diversify his crop portfolio, to bad weather, to high costs of doing business, to unpredictable market conditions and more. And his most important advice to deal with work-related stress? “Go to the bar at night,” he laughs. Third Generation …

Fourth-Generation Farmer Not Afraid to Get His Hands Dirty

As the co-owner of a 15,000-acre farming operation in Wessington, South Dakota, B.J. McNeil can often be found in his office making strategic plans for the farm. But like any good farmer, he’s no stranger to having his boots on the ground – even with six full-time employees. “Often when something breaks down I’m the one that gets out there …

Saskatchewan Farmer Loves Living Farm Legacy In Spite of Challenges

Dean Degelman’s farm in Odessa, a village in southeast Saskatchewan, has been in his family for six generations. And in today’s increasingly challenging climate for small farm businesses in Canada, he feels extremely lucky to have had the opportunity to become part of the family farm operations approximately 20 years ago. “Even when I started, the only way a person …

BUYING A NEW DRILL? THINK ABOUT YOUR OPENERS

A new air drill is a big investment, whatever size your operation. Here are a few things to consider when making a decision about what openers will work best with your new unit. 1. Soil Type. Rocky soil? Choose a high wear vertical opener that will be able to withstand rough terrain. Wet conditions or gumbo? Consider our line of Universal Series …

BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR VERTICILLIUM STRIPE

The Agricultural pathogen called Verticillium longisporum (aka Verticillium Stripe) has now made its way to 6 Canadian provinces; British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Québec according to research by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency[1].  Verticillium Stripe is also present in Sweden, Germany, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, France, the Czech Republic, Belgium, the Netherlands, the U.K., Japan, and areas of USA[2]. What does …

FINDING YOUR SEEDING START DATE SWEET SPOT

There are three factors that have big implications when trying to find your seeding start date: soil temperature, frost potential, and moisture conditions.   Frost Cereals and Peas are the hardier of the crop species when it comes to withstanding the low temperatures that cause frost due to their anatomy (i.e. their growing points are below the soils surface which …

SPEEDING IN A SEEDING ZONE

Our Territory Managers oversee a lot of seeding…it’s what they do, they are our experts in the field.  And when we asked our Territory Managers for just one piece of advice, the “silver bullet” for our readers going into the 2016 seeding season was…Please Don’t Speed in a Seeding Zone.  If your Seeding Speed is too fast, it can most …

FALL BANDING, SPRING BANDING, OR ONE PASS SEEDING

We get a lot of producers that ask us, ‘which method is really best’? Fall Banding, Spring Banding, or One Pass Seeding?  And the answer is unfortunately, it depends… Below is a guide to help you decide which practice is going to be right for you and your farm.   Fall Banding The success of Fall Banding can be simplified …

SAVE MONEY AND INPUTS WHEN SPRAYING

We’ve put together our top ways to save you money and get the most out of your inputs when spraying; whether you are spraying for weeds, insects/pests, or diseases/fungus, we have you covered!   1.) Find Your Economic Threshold [1]:  An Economic Threshold refers to the density of the pest vs. the economic return you would get from the controlled treatment. There are …

MAINTENANCE REMINDER: KEEP YOUR SEED DRILL AT PEAK PERFORMANCE

Before you know it, seeding season will be here. To ensure your seeding equipment is ready to work come spring, it’s important to perform routine maintenance throughout the winter. Our Engineers have compiled the following checklist of recommended farm equipment maintenance.   Air Drill Maintenance Checklist Check your air drill for cracked hydraulic hoses or places where they are rubbing …

IS YOUR GRAIN SAFE THIS WINTER?

Things have finally wound down with harvest, producers are just now getting the chance to clean and perform maintenance on their farm equipment, and they are taking a big sigh of relief knowing that their crop is sitting safely in their bins. Or are they? Sadly, a farmer’s work is never done; once the crop is binned it’s not as …